Last edited by Tygogal
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Spread of the European Starling in North America (to 1928). found in the catalog.

Spread of the European Starling in North America (to 1928).

United States. Dept. of Agriculture.

Spread of the European Starling in North America (to 1928).

by United States. Dept. of Agriculture.

  • 211 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


Edition Notes

1

SeriesUsda Circular -- 40
ContributionsCooke, M.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21753718M

Interesting Facts: All European Starlings in North America are descendants of birds introduced to America in the early ’s. Released in New York City’s Central Park by a society whose mission it was to bring to America birds mentioned in Shakespeare’s works, the starling quickly spread to all corners of North America. In those years, the human population in western North America (the part of the continent that the starling expanded into) grew almost fifty-fold. What were tiny settlements when the starling arrived, blossomed into metropolises in a matter of decades. And with urbanization came new dangers for urban birds: cats and cars.

In New York drug manufacturer Eugene Schieffelin released some 60 European starlings in Central Park. His dream was to introduce every bird mentioned by Shakespeare into North America — an intent that proved to be more Hitchcock than Bard. Schieffelin hoped the songbirds would prosper in their new home in ways the skylarks and song. The Literally, Literary Story Behind the ‘Ubiquitous’ Starling. Posted on J Updated on J By Ken Zurski. In , a man named Eugene Scheiffelin, a member of the American Acclimation Society, a group designed to exchange plants and animals from another part of the world to the United States, imported about 40 starlings from Europe to New York City.

  "Mozart's Starling," by Lyanda Lynn Haupt. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR) This article is more than 3 years old. When naturalist and author Lyanda Lynn .   European starlings were introduced into North America in , in Pennsylvania; in Ohio, in Oregon and in New York City. The latter introduction was the most infamous.


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Spread of the European Starling in North America (to 1928) by United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Spread of the European starling in North America. [May Thacher Cooke]. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Cooke, May Thacher, Spread of the European starling in North America (to ).

Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. The Spread of the European Starling in North America (to ) by May Thacher Cooke () Editor Charles H. Smith's Note: At the time of publication of this short monographic work, Ms.

Cooke was a Scientific Aid at the Bureau of Biological Survey, Division of Biological Investigations. The common starling (Sturnus vulgaris), also known as the European starling in the United States or simply the starling in the British Isles, is a medium-sized passerine bird in the starling family, is about 20 cm (8 in) long and has glossy black plumage with a metallic sheen, which is speckled with white at some times of year.

The legs are pink and the bill is black in winter and Class: Aves. The Spread of the European Starling in North America. United States Department of Agriculture, Circular No. United States Department of Agriculture, Circular No. Google Scholar. Often regarded as a pest, the Starling wins our grudging admiration for its adaptability, toughness, and seeming intelligence.

Brought to North America init has spread to occupy most of the continent, and is now abundant in many areas. Sociable at most seasons, Starlings may gather in immense flocks in fall and winter. When the flocks break up for the breeding season, males reveal a.

If you live in North America, you probably recognize European starlings, those little black birds with white polka dots that chirp and chatter and, in the winter, hang out in flocks of thousands. Abstract: The introduction of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in New York City in and resulted in their permanent establishment in North America.

The successful occupation of North America (and most other continents as well) has earned the starling a nomination in the Top list of ‘Worlds Worst’ invaders.

It has also spread to Fiji, Jamaica and Puerto Rico. There are reports of European Starlings breeding in Argentina and occurring in Antarctic islands and Papua New Guinea. In North America the European Starling is found from the Atlantic to the Pacific (east to west) and from central Canada to northern Mexico (north to south).

Interestingly. Starling History in North America. The European Starling, also known as the Common Starling, is a small bird native to Eurasia, but introduced in South Africa, North America, Australia and New Zealand.

Prior to there were two attempts to introduce the starling in North America, in the northeast and on the West Coast. First brought to North America by Shakespeare enthusiasts in the nineteenth century, European Starlings are now among the continent’s most numerous songbirds.

They are stocky black birds with short tails, triangular wings, and long, pointed bills. Though they’re sometimes resented for their abundance and aggressiveness, they’re still dazzling birds when you get a good look.

The group shipped all kinds of animals over from Europe, and their campaign of introductions was devastatingly successful, being at least partly responsible for the populations of House Sparrows, Java Finches, Brook Trout, and other non-natives that have spread across North America.

European Starling. Photo: Jonathan Feis/Great Backyard Bird Count. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip.

Video An illustration of an audio speaker. The spread of the European starling in North America (to ) Item Preview The spread of the European starling in North America (to ) by Cooke, May Thacher, Publication date Topics Sturnus vulgaris.

The European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) was introduced from Great Britain in in an effort to bring all species mentioned in the works of William Shakespeare to North America.

Approximately 60 individuals were released into New York City’s Central Park. Another 70 or so were released at the same time in Portland, Oregon.

European starlings are widespread across North America. They eat a wide variety of foods and are willing to use a wide variety of places to nest and roost. This flexible nature helps them thrive in cities and suburbs as well as on farms.

They are one of only a few birds who live in otherwise barren industrial urban wastelands. The release of flocks totaling about European Starlings in Central Park in New York City in and triggered an explosive expansion to an estimated population of million birds spread across North America.

The first starling was found in Texas insuggesting an almost exponential range and population expansion. The effort failed twice before a successful introduction of about 60 birds was made in New York City's Central Park in Those birds reproduced and spread quickly across developed and other human-altered habitats.

European Starlings were first recorded in Washington inonly 53 years later. Today in the Book of North American Birds, the European Starling (whose name still playfully carries its immigration status) is found in nearly all of inhabitable North America and year round, unlike the common robin, which is seasonal in many parts of the country.

Sometimes, we do things we can, then find out we shouldn’t. Ina Shakespeare fan named Eugene Schieffelin, who had read about starlings in the Bard’s “Henry IV,” was inspired to bring some of the birds with him to America. He brought 60 European starlings to New York and released them in Central Park.

The Starling was once called the European Starling, a black-coloured bird that was introduced into the eastern region of North America in the 's. This bird can now be found throughout the continent.

It has the ability to thrive in many different habitats and a wide range of landscapes. The year was when an eccentric drug manufacturer named Eugene Schieffelin entered New York City's Central Park and released some 60 European .The European starling, as the name implies, is not native to North America.

It was introduced to the United States in the late 's and has spread across the continent. The starling, a Cavity Nester, is an aggressive species that competes with our native cavity nesting birds.They first appeared in Tennessee inand by they had spread to upper Alaska.

European Starlings now breed across all of North America and only the Canadian birds migrate south in winter. Starlings became established so easily because they are habitat generalists able to exploit a large variety of habitats, nest sites, and food sources.